Collapse-O-Matic > Scroll On Close Test

[expand title="Standard Scroll On Close" id="socstand" scrollonclose="300"]

Standard Scroll On Close
World Record Attempt

There is such a thing as an upward spiral, but it has an evil twin. Having less to do leads to less internal chemistry; less internal resources. Less even emotional resources to deal with things. It can make us want to withdraw as our ability to handle what little we do have waffles. This in turn means even less dopamine, and as you can see, this little feedback loop looks a lot like toilet water going down a drain.

This is the paradox of a circuit that helps sustain us and a clue to the nature of depression: the downward spiral effect.

The problem with dopamine is that it is fickle. Stumble out of balance for just a moment and the dopamine system will turn a stumble into a crash. It can start predictably enough: you are in a new town and don’t know anyone. You had a recent tragedy in life and are legitimately grieving. You just don’t know what to do with yourself, which direction to take, so you try to content yourself with idle distractions. They are all legitimate circumstances. Eventually, though, boredom can slip into something else.

Whatever reason your slight disengagement, not doing things will procure less dopamine. With less dopaminergic activity, you become slightly less motivated, slightly less yearning for anything that would require action on your part. Why? With less dopamine, rewards are a little less appealing, and so is the will to attain them. You become irritated as you feel yourself become sluggish; your mind is less sharp and you observe and remember less. Setting one less goal becomes setting a few less; we sleep in longer and take more naps. Irritation turns to anger which gets in the way of even our remaining goals and we make more mistakes. Now we feel that we have almost no juice in the battery, no gas in the tank. We genuinely want to get some rest because we feel tired all the time. Things that once seemed shimmery start to lose their luster altogether; things that once made us sit up and take notice seem barely worth mentioning.

What is happening is a subjective feedback loop that does it’s damage by convincing you to do what is worst for you. Accomplishing fewer things means less dopamine, less drive – of course you don’t want to do anything! As the feedback loop plays out, lethargy turns into apathy and anhedonia – the inability to feel pleasure or motivation. The catch-22 is that we need to do things to get the chemistry to keep doing things. Not doing things prevents us from getting the chemistry that would make us want to do things. We have a stereotypes of laziness that we use to judge others (another chemical function to explore later) but it is a destructive view because when we turn it on ourself, it doesn’t take something into consideration: the ubiquity and predictability of our paradoxical chemistry.

Dopaminergic systems can wreak havoc by attacking anyone’s will, making them tired and making them feel with absolute intensity that they want nothing more than to take a nap. Forever.

Fighting this phenomena is not easy because it is a chemical phenomena. The feeling of having no will is absolutely real: you don’t. Paradoxically, though, to get out of this feedback loop requires nothing less than fighting your biology by actually doing something. Ever felt like you didn’t want to do something but were happy you did after? That is required to short-circuit the downward spiral: mistrusting your subjective radar and taking leaps of faith.

Motivation When we have no dopamine we have the inverse of a positive state of psychological rewards: apathy (the inability to care), amotivation (the inability to be motivated), anhedonia (the inability to feel pleasure). It makes things worse by attacking our subjective sense of what we should do; making us act in ways that makes us worse. And all people can get this way if they disengage for even a second; our system is completely unforgiving. It is what happens when we dip out of the flow of social engagement and for whatever reason, don’t stay engaged; can’t stay optimistic; don’t know what to look forward to or can’t.

The downward spiral is real, paralyzing and physical. It can be an insidious process that happens to everyone, often through a completely predictable series of events that make sense through dopamine logic, even when our emotions blame us and make it worse.

Why? Why do this to us? Mother Nature’s as cruel as a tough-loving mother here because she does what she does for a cause. It is a cause best illustrated by what happens when we spiral up.

Collapse

[expand title="Internal Scroll To Trigger" id="socinternal"]
<span id="bot-socinternal" class="collapseomatic colomat-close scroll-to-trigger">Collapse</span>

Internal Scroll To Trigger
World Record Attempt

There is such a thing as an upward spiral, but it has an evil twin. Having less to do leads to less internal chemistry; less internal resources. Less even emotional resources to deal with things. It can make us want to withdraw as our ability to handle what little we do have waffles. This in turn means even less dopamine, and as you can see, this little feedback loop looks a lot like toilet water going down a drain.

This is the paradox of a circuit that helps sustain us and a clue to the nature of depression: the downward spiral effect.

The problem with dopamine is that it is fickle. Stumble out of balance for just a moment and the dopamine system will turn a stumble into a crash. It can start predictably enough: you are in a new town and don’t know anyone. You had a recent tragedy in life and are legitimately grieving. You just don’t know what to do with yourself, which direction to take, so you try to content yourself with idle distractions. They are all legitimate circumstances. Eventually, though, boredom can slip into something else.

Whatever reason your slight disengagement, not doing things will procure less dopamine. With less dopaminergic activity, you become slightly less motivated, slightly less yearning for anything that would require action on your part. Why? With less dopamine, rewards are a little less appealing, and so is the will to attain them. You become irritated as you feel yourself become sluggish; your mind is less sharp and you observe and remember less. Setting one less goal becomes setting a few less; we sleep in longer and take more naps. Irritation turns to anger which gets in the way of even our remaining goals and we make more mistakes. Now we feel that we have almost no juice in the battery, no gas in the tank. We genuinely want to get some rest because we feel tired all the time. Things that once seemed shimmery start to lose their luster altogether; things that once made us sit up and take notice seem barely worth mentioning.

What is happening is a subjective feedback loop that does it’s damage by convincing you to do what is worst for you. Accomplishing fewer things means less dopamine, less drive – of course you don’t want to do anything! As the feedback loop plays out, lethargy turns into apathy and anhedonia – the inability to feel pleasure or motivation. The catch-22 is that we need to do things to get the chemistry to keep doing things. Not doing things prevents us from getting the chemistry that would make us want to do things. We have a stereotypes of laziness that we use to judge others (another chemical function to explore later) but it is a destructive view because when we turn it on ourself, it doesn’t take something into consideration: the ubiquity and predictability of our paradoxical chemistry.

Dopaminergic systems can wreak havoc by attacking anyone’s will, making them tired and making them feel with absolute intensity that they want nothing more than to take a nap. Forever.

Fighting this phenomena is not easy because it is a chemical phenomena. The feeling of having no will is absolutely real: you don’t. Paradoxically, though, to get out of this feedback loop requires nothing less than fighting your biology by actually doing something. Ever felt like you didn’t want to do something but were happy you did after? That is required to short-circuit the downward spiral: mistrusting your subjective radar and taking leaps of faith.

Motivation When we have no dopamine we have the inverse of a positive state of psychological rewards: apathy (the inability to care), amotivation (the inability to be motivated), anhedonia (the inability to feel pleasure). It makes things worse by attacking our subjective sense of what we should do; making us act in ways that makes us worse. And all people can get this way if they disengage for even a second; our system is completely unforgiving. It is what happens when we dip out of the flow of social engagement and for whatever reason, don’t stay engaged; can’t stay optimistic; don’t know what to look forward to or can’t.

The downward spiral is real, paralyzing and physical. It can be an insidious process that happens to everyone, often through a completely predictable series of events that make sense through dopamine logic, even when our emotions blame us and make it worse.

Why? Why do this to us? Mother Nature’s as cruel as a tough-loving mother here because she does what she does for a cause. It is a cause best illustrated by what happens when we spiral up.

Collapse

Find Me
This is a test of the find-me feature

Collapse-O-Matic Jumping Animation Test

Jumping Beans
  • Defended national credit card processing company against breach of contract and trademark infringement claims brought by a worldwide credit card brand network, and pursued antitrust and other unfair competition claims on behalf of the processing company.
  • Represented LendingTree, LLC in litigation against former employees and mortgage brokers for alleged computer hacking and theft of borrower lead information
  • As co-lead counsel, represented MCI in federal court action concerning software development contract, trade secret and business tort claims; case settled on eve of trial
  • Represented technology distributor Ingram Micro Inc. in third-party discovery proceedings in antitrust and class action litigation between AMD and Intel
  • Litigated cases of first impression concerning distribution rights for beer distributors under the California Brand Transfer Law, Business & Professions Code § 25000.2
  • Represented client in third party discovery proceedings in federal multidistrict Graphic Processing Units antitrust litigation

Collapse-O-Matic > Find-Me ID Test

The Wookiees’ natural habitats were the dense forests of the planet Kashyyyk (though one source does imply that they were immigrants to this planet). Kashyyyk was covered with massive wroshyr trees, in which the Wookiees constructed their homes and cities. Reportedly, Wookiees were descended from tree-climbing mammals.
They had the ability to easily learn most languages. However, Wookiees lacked the vocal structure to speak anything other than their own languages.

Adult Wookiees were tall, in excess of two meters in height, and were covered with a uniform, mid-length coat of thick hair in various shades of brown. Although albino Wookiees were rare, they were not unheard of. However, such a birth was generally held to be a bad omen, as white hair did not blend in with the earth-tones of their forest surroundings.

Young Wookiees (pups) were large at birth (averaging slightly less than one meter). Wookiees possessed vicious-looking retractable claws for climbing. Female Wookiees had six breasts and gave birth to live-born young, with their gestation period nearly a year long. After birth, a Wookiee grew very fast, fully conscious and able to walk unassisted within one standard year. The average lifespan of Wookiees was around 600 years. In spite of their bestial appearance, Wookiees were highly intelligent and had mastered advanced technology, including hyperspace travel. Wookiees also possessed exceptional skill in mechanical repair. An old saying was “Give a Wookiee a knife and send him into a forest in the morning, and by evening he would have carved you a table to eat dinner on – and a house to put it in.”[3]

Wookiees were often short-tempered. When Chewbacca complained about a move in a game of dejarik that R2-D2 had made during their initial trip to Alderaan, Han Solo told C-3PO that it was not a good idea to upset a Wookiee—because an upset Wookiee would tear a person’s arms out of their sockets. Despite their temper and great strength, Wookiees were usually gentle and affectionate with their friends and family. Wookiees were also able to get infected from the Blackwing virus. Wookiees were also among the variety of species that could develop asthma.[3]

Do not fight a Wookiee
In addition, Wookiees, if tired, are also significantly dangerous to deal with when fighting them, even more so than when they are awake.[4]

Collapse-O-Matic > Lock Open

An element can be set to ‘lock open’ once it has been expanded by setting trigclass=”colomat-expand-only”:

I am a normal expand
yay
I am a locked open expand
yay

Also works for grouping (Star Wars will lock open):

Fiction

Star Wars
Target Content
Star Trek
Target Content
Battlestar Galactica
Target Content

Fact

Space Race
Target Content
Ansari X Prize
Target Content

Also works for highlander-grouping (Monkeys will lock open):

Fiction

Monkeys
Target Content
Donkeys
Target Content

Also works for nested elements (level 3 will stay open):

Root Level
Nested Level 1
Nested Level 2
Nested Level 3
Nested Level 4
Nested Level 5
Nested Level 6
Nested Level 7

And of course expand/collapse all triggers:

Expand All
Collapse All

Collapse-O-Matic > iFrame Test

Instructiefilms van de Omniplan Adviesplanner

Instructiefilms van de Omniplan Adviesplanner

Om een indruk te krijgen van de Omniplan Adviesplanner kunt u onze instructiefilms bekijken.

Hoe maak ik een volledige planning in de Adviesplanner?

Voor overige films, klik hier.

Collapse-O-Matic > Multiple Triggers

First create a standard collapse element and assign it an id:
[expand title="This is the Master Trigger" id="multitrig"]

This is the Master Trigger
This is some text that when you click on the trigger you are able to read with your eyes. Well, your eyes are able to see the text, but I guess it’s actually your brain that reads the words and makes sense of them. But jokes on you! There is no sense to be made from these words because they are just pure jibber-jabber.

Now if an additional trigger link is needed, just insert a span with “collapseomatic noarrow” class and and id that is ‘bot-[the_target_id]’ like so:
<span class="collapseomatic noarrow" id="bot-multitrig">This is a second trigger</span>
This is a second trigger

Collapse-Pro-Matic Class Triggers

As of version 1.3.2 of Collapse-Pro-Matic an external trigger can also be assigned to any element using only class names. Check out collapse-pro-matic advanced external triggers for more information and a working demo.

Collapse-O-Matic Centered Titlte

This title is Left
This is left stuff that makes the wonky wank wonder spank

To center the text first add the following to the theme’s style.css file:
.centron {
text-align: center;
}

Next, add the trigclass=”centron” attributes to the expand shortcode:
[expand title="This title is Centered" trigclass="centron"]

This title is Centered
This is the text that makes the baw-bitty-baw-ba-baw-ba-baw-baw ditty bitty baw ditty dong de up chuck the monkey

Note: if the default tag is not already set to div, the tag=”div” attribute will need to be added as well.

Single Line Jedi Countdown

This is a countdown, style jedi, with weeks removed

days
0
-187
-8
hours
0
-9
minutes
-3
-8
seconds
-3
-1

days where forced to show on the same line as Hours, Minutes and Seconds by adding the following css to the theme’s style.css file plugin’s option page under the Custom Css section:

.jedi-hours_dash {
clear: none !important;
}

Now, seconds are being pushed to the next line because the width of the dashboard is not wide enough. The dashboard is expanded to 298px to fit Days, Hours, Mins and Secs on the same line by adding the following css to the theme’s style.css file plugin’s option page under the Custom Css section:

.jedi-dashboard {
width: 298px !important;
}